Question of the day: what place will remain for the elderly in the post-pandemic world?
Analytics

Question of the day: what place will remain for the elderly in the post-pandemic world?

6 May , 20:20
When the coronavirus epidemic ends, humanity will most likely become ethically tougher to pensioners, on the principle: "you have lived your own, now free up a place for the others ..."

The pandemic had a profound effect on all human activities, without exception, including, of course, journalism. Few journalists can turn out without stating a fact in their material today: after coronavirus, the world will never be the same again, and then more or less well-founded fantasies on the topic follow... A well-known journalist Pavel Pryanikov did not stand aside as well, he tried to predict the nearest future in his blog:

“Over and over again I think more about how the Covid has already changed the society. For example, the relationship of generations. Children and youth up to the age of 25-30 are now a walking asymptomatic bio-bomb. Their meeting with the elderly is equated with an act of terror. Perhaps half a year or a year (or even a lifetime, if the Progressors don’t give us the vaccine), old people will not be able to communicate with their grandchildren. The stigmatization of the former “colors of life” will gradually increase. Youth is a walking death for the rest.

There will be two or three disjoint worlds. The world of youth, the world of wary middle-aged sapiens and the world of isolated old people.

Rethinking the need for the existence of large, close collectives - nursing homes, army with barracks and ships, shift workers, prisons, dormitories for migrant workers. Potentially, with the last fall, around the world, humanitarian operations will have to be carried out to expel them: a world affected by enormous unemployment no longer needs their services. In Moscow, a resident of Kaluga and Ryazan (or even a Muscovite himself) will quite happily apply for an Uzbek / Kyrgyz in a taxi with a salary of 30-40 thousand.

The same is true for other cities. Euronews watched today, and there they showed how in London they already live on the street and beg for alms and free food Montenegrins, Romanians and Portuguese - who lost their jobs in the service sector. A world without refugees, migrant workers, idle movements in space - this throws us somewhere a century ago. Everyone will be focused on their small world, the regional unit at the yard level, the maximum of the microdistrict - and even inside their generational stratum ... ”

Readers of Pryanikov basically agreed with him, adding their thoughts on this topic. So Vladimir Lubyanko writes:

With regard to age-related tension, I think the opposite is that the ethical world will simply become tougher and return to an older attitude towards the elderly -“ have lived their own way ”, and the hedonism of the Westerners of retirees, created by strong Western medicine, will be reduced.

There simply will not be time left for retirement individualism - death on the threshold right after retirement, traveling freely as before probably also will not work. Family landmarks — children, grandchildren, and religiosity — will come back, just like at least some sense of life. .. "

A blogger Nobul Nobul denies the author, sharing his observations:

Well, in my opinion from the province, everything is not so gloomy. Yes, shopping centers and cafes were forcibly closed. Yes, sometimes it is possible to meet ill people in masks in the city. Yes, there will be many bankrupted. But fortunately there is no age-related distance. And all these problems are caused only by prohibitions. They are not associated with the necessity, but only with the madness of the authorities. And as for the freedom of movement for the elderly, the fact is that it did not take place anyway: the only chances were to go to the market, to the country and to the post-office for the pension payment, that’s all the movement in the province..."

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