Americans simulated a thermonuclear strike on Moscow
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Americans simulated a thermonuclear strike on Moscow

7 May , 10:54TechnologyPhoto: www.wearethemighty.com
A United States military media brand run by veterans We Are The Mighty predicted what damage would bring an explosion of a thermonuclear bomb with a capacity of 10 thousand megatons.

The consequences of using such bomb are described in an article about a Hungarian-American theoretical physicist Edward Teller, who was involved in the development of thermonuclear weapons.

For the construction of this model was used a public computer simulator Nukemap. The authors of the article showed that when a thermonuclear bomb detonate in the center of Moscow, not only the Russian capital could be wiped off the face of the earth, but also the regions adjacent to it. Radioactive fallout would fall at a distance of about one and a half thousand kilometers from the epicenter.

According to the authors of the article, Teller planned to create super-powerful weapons, but after years of research in the early 50s, the US government decided that there was no practical sense in such developments. The reason for refusing further work on the project was that when using thermonuclear weapons against the USSR, there was a real threat of radioactive contamination both in Western Europe and the United States. It is noted that one such bomb would be enough to destroy Great Britain, France, Germany or North and South Korea. Teller later switched to another project.

- Theoretically, such a weapon is real. But I would like to hope that no one will be able to assemble a team of people who would be smart enough, as well as stupid, to create this weapon. Eventually our nuclear arsenals are large enough to destroy the world several times. Do we really need one bomb capable of this? - the author of the publication writes.

We recall that the US Department of Energy suggested that American President Donald Trump push Russia out of the nuclear technology market.

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