Blogger who wrote about how to kill her husband is accused of killing her husband

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Blogger who wrote about how to kill her husband is accused of killing her husband
Blogger who wrote about how to kill her husband is accused of killing her husband
26 May, 12:16In the worldPhoto: The Seattle Times
The defendant stated that the prosecution had chosen "an erroneous storyline."

In the US city of Portland, Nancy Brophy, a 71-year-old amateur writer who is considered guilty of her husband's murder, will soon be charged, reports The New York Post. As a retired woman, Brophy wrote blogs and wrote detective-romance novels, in which, in her own words, she talked about the life of “beautiful men and strong women, about families in which everything does not always work out, about , what happiness to find love and how difficult it is to keep it.

One of the blog entries, made in 2011, was titled "How to Kill Your Husband." Reflecting on this topic, Nancy Brophy writes that a wife who wants to kill her husband must be "ruthless" and "very smart" because she is likely to be the main suspect. Choosing between different methods of killing, Brophy writes that the knife is too bloody, the poison is too easy to detect, and the assassins are too unreliable. As for firearms, she described them as "dirty" and "requiring skill".

During the process, the judge forbade mentioning the work of the suspect as evidence, however, the prosecution hinted at this during interrogation, asking Brophy the question: “If there is something you know about the murder, it is that someone is capable of doing it”?

The defendant was portrayed by prosecutors as a cold-blooded and two-faced woman who carefully planned her crime. A few months before Daniel Brophy's murder, his wife bought a set of makeshift weapons and a pistol. She then ordered an additional slide and barrel from eBay that could be installed on the finished gun. This additional set, which could have been a confirmation of the fired bullets, was never found during the investigation. Thus prepared, the woman, prosecutors say, shot and killed her husband at his workplace, where there were no cameras or witnesses. It happened at the Culinary Institute of Oregon, where he taught. The body was discovered by students who came to class. The investigation showed that he had been shot twice.

When the detectives informed Mrs. Brophy that her husband was dead and asked her to describe the details of that morning, she said that her husband got up, as usual, early, fed the chickens and walked the dogs. She woke up while he was taking a shower. A little after seven in the morning, he left for work. What she was doing at the time of the murder, Brophy did not remember: probably making coffee or taking notes for a future book. However, investigators found a video recording that showed that at that time the woman was driving in her car near the institute where her husband died. The prosecution considers the financial difficulties experienced by the spouses to be the motive for the murder. A few days after her husband's death, Nancy Brophy applied for a certificate stating that she was not a suspect - the document was required to receive several hundred thousand dollars from her husband's insurance policy.

The defendant denied all charges. According to her, she could give false information to detectives because she was stunned by the news of the murder. As for the gun, it was bought by her husband and was intended for self-defense. Another set was also purchased with his knowledge: Nancy Brophy studied it while composing the scene in which the heroine takes revenge on her abusive husband. According to the suspect, the version invented by the accusers does not hold water: “If I brought this to the editor, he would laugh and say:“ You need to work more carefully on this story, there are too many holes in it.

During the trial, the prosecution stated that their position was based on "circumstantial evidence" and that the jury needed to piece together the pieces of the "jigsaw puzzle" in order to make their decision. The defense, in turn, argued that the suspect could not have committed the crime because she was happy with her husband, friends and family members confirmed this, and the charge was based on "suspicions" and "assumptions." Lawyers also showed CCTV footage of a suspicious homeless man loitering around the crime scene when police arrived at the scene.

Nancy Brophy's murder charge carries a life sentence. The verdict is due June 13th.

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