Business under the hammer: the number of advertisements for the sale of business in Russia increased by a third
14 October , 23:22
Economy
Photo: Ура.ру
Russian businessmen are getting rid of assets en masse. In recent months, the number of people willing to sell their business has grown by 28%. First of all, entrepreneurs are trying to get rid of hotels, fitness clubs, offices, hookah and hairdressing salons.

As reported by Vedomosti, citing a study by CIAN. Commercial, the desire of entrepreneurs to get rid of business confirms analysts' forecasts about an imminent wave of bankruptcies in Russia.

According to The Bell, the worst business situation is in Ufa, Samara and Voronezh. There, the number of entrepreneurs willing to sell their business has doubled. Owners in Rostov-on-Don, Kazan and Nizhny Novgorod began to put their businesses up for auction one and a half times more often. In Moscow, Chelyabinsk, Volgograd and Novosibirsk, the number of similar ads increased by 28%.

According to the ads, the owners consider hotels to be the most toxic asset: the number of offers for their sale in the country increased by 49%.

They are followed by offices (up 36%), followed by objects of the entertainment industry - hookah, nightclubs, galleries, bowling alleys, recreation centers (+ 25%). Dance schools, fitness clubs, swimming pools and gyms are now listed for sale more often by 24%. The offer for the sale of beauty salons, hairdressing salons, massage and manicure salons, as well as private kindergartens and development centers increased by 15%.

According to analysts, in the first nine months, the number of IP bankruptcies increased by 65%. This is due to the fact that, in contrast to large companies, in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, individual entrepreneurs turned out to be much more difficult to obtain support measures announced by the state. A new wave of bankruptcies in Russia is expected to begin in October and intensify in early 2021. Opinion polls indicate that panic has gripped many entrepreneurs in anticipation of the second wave of coronavirus. About 60% of those surveyed are convinced that their business will not “survive” a new lockdown in the event of the reintroduction of restrictive measures in the country.