Russian special services are suspected of preparing the attempt against the Mayor of Prague
27 April , 17:28
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Photo: currenttime.tv
An employee of the Russian special services, who arrived on the eve of Prague with a diplomatic passport, was suspected of allegedly planning an assassination attempt against the mayor of the Czech capital (pictured): a poisonous substance was found under the Russians. The Kremlin called the message "duck."

A Russian with a diplomatic passport arrived in Prague three weeks ago. He was met by the car of the Russian embassy, which took him to the building of the diplomatic corps. The Czech police knew about the arrival of the diplomat and suspected him of the possible organization of an assassination attempt on Czech officials. Under him, police discovered poison ricin. Law enforcement authorities suspect that the Russian was preparing an assassination attempt against the mayor of the city of Zdenek Grzyb and the head of the district administration of the city of Ondrzej Kolarz.

Earlier, the mayor decided to rename the square in front of the Russian government in the Czech Republic in honor of the shot dead Boris Nemtsov, and the head of the administration decided to demolish the monument to Soviet Marshal Ivan Konev, who freed Czechoslovakia, which caused dissatisfaction in the Kremlin. Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu called on Kolarge to prosecute for damage to military monuments. Kolarge said that it was unacceptable for residents of the city to perpetuate the person responsible for the post-war arrest and deportation of Czechoslovak citizens of Russian origin who fled here from Stalin. The other day, Kolarge said that he was being monitored and asked for protection from the local police, writes the Czech publication Respekt.

Marshal Konev commanded the First Ukrainian Front in World War II. His army participated in the battles for Prague, defeated a large German group. Also, the marshal's troops participated in the assault on Berlin. Earlier, the monument to Konev in the Czech Republic was already desecrated in the past and the year before last, dousing him with paint.

Presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov called the Czech publication a “furphy”. “We are not aware of this investigation at all, ” Interfax writes with reference to Peskov’s words. Peskov refused to comment on the connection of the allegedly planned attack with the dismantling of the monument, citing the fact that Russia’s position on this matter has already been voiced several times. The Czechs dismantled their monument, and, no matter how insulting Russia was, they had a right to it. Now he is likely to be transferred to the museum of Soviet occupation, so there is no need to fear that the monument will disappear without a trace.