The question of the century: why doesn't anyone ban the "Communist party Manifesto"?
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The question of the century: why doesn't anyone ban the "Communist party Manifesto"?

3 December 2020, 15:41
From the point of view of the radicality of calls for violence and the specificity of goal-setting, the Manifesto is an order of magnitude more radical than Mein Kampf

Interesting analogy between two odious books, and even more wide - exercises, conducted in his blog analyst Dmitry Nekrasov:

“I have re-read the Communist Manifesto here and thought about this. In some countries, Mein Kampf is banned, but the Manifesto is not.

It is clear that the ideology of fascism is responsible for the Holocaust. However, Marxist ideology led in the twentieth century to a noticeably greater number of senseless deaths (USSR, China, Cambodia...) than Nazi theories. The difference between ethnicity and social origin massacres is hard to see. And from the point of view of the radicality of calls for violence and the specificity of goal-setting, the Manifesto is an order of magnitude more radical than Mein Kampf.

Differences are also observed in attitudes towards contemporary left and right literature. I haven't read much about radicals, but if you compare the mainstream reaction to Capital in the 21st Century by Tom Piketty and to Germany Self-Liquidation by Thilo Saracen, the difference is striking. Though the books are very similar. Both there and there a sea of statistics, indications of some injustice and inefficiency of the existing socio-economic system and quite constructive (in form) proposals for changing public policy. Without a shadow of radicalism and calls for violence.

However, many have called Saracen a fascist, and Piketty is a respected economist.

The main argument against studies of interethnic or interfaith differences, and in particular against any practical conclusions from such studies, boils down to the fact that such studies will provide arguments for right-wing radical political movements. And can lead to intolerance, violence and murder. However, similar in form and style, leftist studies on inequality and injustice in the economic system can provide the same arguments for left-wing radicals, and Capital in the 21st Century is just as likely to provoke mass murder as Germany Self-Liquidation. In my opinion, even more.

I do not mean that "Mein Kampf" should be allowed or, God forbid, "Manifesto" should be banned. In the modern world, any prohibitions are meaningless. Anyone who wants to read anything. On the whole, both works should be considered only from the perspective of the history of political thought.

It's just that the difference in attitude to essentially identical things is completely illogical and anachronistic..."

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